Presenters

Pramit Chaudhuri

Pramit Chaudhuri

Dartmouth College

Pramit Chaudhuri (Ph.D. Yale) is Associate Professor of Classics at Dartmouth College, where he specializes in the Latin poetry of the early Roman empire, set within a broader study of classical and early modern epic and tragedy. Topics of research have included Vergilian wordplay and Shakespeare’s collaborative work, which have appeared in Classical Quarterly and ELH: English Literary History respectively. Following his recent book on human-divine conflict in Latin literature, The War with God (Oxford 2014), he is currently working on three principal projects: a book on the representation of debate and diplomacy in Roman epic and historiography; a collaborative project with researchers from Harvard and Cambridge on computational approaches to intertextuality; and a book series on genre designed for a general readership. His work on the intertextuality project is supported by an ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowship for 2015-16.

Guy P. Raffa

Guy P. Raffa

The University of Texas at Austin

Guy P. Raffa, Associate Professor of Italian Studies, directs the Danteworlds website. The author of three books and many scholarly articles on Dante, he brings his expertise into the piazza by writing for popular venues, such as The Chronicle of Higher Education, PopMatters, and Life & Letters. A recipient of research fellowships from the NEH and the American Council of Learned Societies, he has also won university-wide awards for teaching and the innovative use of instructional technology.

Matthew Russell

Matthew Russell

The University of Texas at Austin

Matthew is currently a digital pedagogy specialist and lecturer in Rhetoric and Writing at UT-Austin. He was one of the founding Directors of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Digital Humanities Lab. He received his PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Texas at Austin, where he was also an Assistant Director of the Digital Writing and Research Lab, editor of Currents in Electronic Literacy and founding member of “Blogging Pedagogy.” He has received numerous grants for work in the digital humanities, including grants from the National Endowment of the Humanities for work on electronic commentary software. Currently, he is interested in visualization software.

Crocker

Ellen Crocker

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Ellen Crocker is Senior Lecturer in German in Global Studies and Languages at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she has been developing the curriculum and teaching the full range of language courses since 1981. Crocker is author and co-author for two college-level textbooks for German published in multiple editions: the first-year textbook Neue Horizonte, Dollenmayer and Hansen, Cengage, and the intermediate-level workbook for communicative strategies Reden-Mitreden-Dazwischenreden, Heinle and Heinle, first edition co-authored with Claire Kramsch, iBook forthcoming. Her most recent research projects investigate the pedagogical design and the implementation of digital media for on-line collaborative learning environments. In der Niederlausitz is designed as an interactive investigation of environmental and societal issues in a multi-cultural region in southeast Germany. Crocker is co-author with MIT colleague Kurt Fendt of the NEH-funded collaborative interactive documentary Berliner sehen that explores societal changes in a constantly changing metropolis. She completed her Magister Artium in Applied Linguistics and Modern German Literature at the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität in Freiburg, Germany in 1976.

Fendt

Kurt E. Fendt

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Kurt Fendt is a scholar of literary and cultural studies with extensive expertise in the application of information technologies to arts and humanities research and education. He is Principal Research Associate in Comparative Media Studies/Writing (CMS/W) at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Executive Director of MIT’s HyperStudio for Digital Humanities. He teaches Digital Humanities subjects in CMS/W and German Studies courses in Global Studies and Languages (GSL). Fendt has held Visiting Professorships at the University of Cologne, the Technical University of Aachen (both Germany), and the University of Klagenfurt, Austria; in 2001 he was Visiting Scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute in Sankt Augustin, Germany. He is co-Principal Investigator of the NEH-funded “Annotation Studio: Multimedia Annotation for Students” and a number of other digital humanities projects. He is co-author (with Ellen Crocker) of the NEH-funded interactive media documentary for German Studies “Berliner sehen”. Before coming to MIT in 1993, Fendt was Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Linguistics at the University of Bern in Switzerland, where he established the Media Learnter for the Humanities and earned his Ph.D. in modern German literature with a thesis on hypertext and text theory in 1993.

Carl

Carl Blyth

The University of Texas at Austin

Carl Blyth is the Director of the Center of Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) and Associate Professor of French Linguistics in the Department of French and Italian. He has held several administrative positions prior to COERLL: Coordinator of Lower Division French (1993-2002), Acting Director of Technology, Literacy and Culture (2001-2002), and Director/Asst Director of the UT Summer Program in Lyon, France. He has worked with colleagues on an online reference grammar of French (Tex’s French Grammar), and a multimedia-based first year French program (Français interactif).

Dilworth Parkinson

Dilworth Parkinson

Brigham Young University

Dilworth Parkinson has been a professor of Arabic at Brigham Young University since 1980. He earned his Ph.D. in Arabic Linguistics from the University of Michigan. Since 2009 he has been spending Fall Semester of every year in Jordan directing BYU’s Intensive Arabic Study Abroad Program. His initial training was in sociolinguistics, but in the last couple of decades he has been involved in developing computational approaches to investigating Arabic. He started to develop what became arabiCorpus.byu.edu as a way to get data for the book Using Arabic Synonyms. After that corpus was made public, he developed another with Tim Buckwalter to serve as the basis of A Frequency Dictionary for Arabic. He is currently developing an online Arabic-English dictionary for students at arabicdictionary.byu.edu.